Home > Publications > Hong Kong Medical Journal

Hong Kong Medical Journal

Hong Kong Medical Journal is the official peer-reviewed publication of the Hong Kong Academy of Medicine and the Hong Kong Medical Association. It is indexed in Medline/Index Medicus and Embase/Excerpta Medica, and is published bimonthly by the

Hong Kong Academy of Medicine Press

The Journal is currently circulated to all Fellows of the Academy, members of the Association and other medical institutions. It is also available to non-members on subscription.

 For more information, please visit the Journal website: http://www.hkmj.org   

 


Hong Kong Medical Journal
Hong Kong Medical Journal


Latest articles available at www.hkmj.org:

Doctor for Society

Part of a larger whole: serving in the Government Flying Service. An interview with Dr. Ralph Cheung
Dr. Ralph Koon-ho Cheung is an emergency medicine specialist at the Prince of Wales Hospital. Dr. Cheung has also served as an Air Medical Officer in the Government Flying Service for the past 12 years. Dr. Cheung discusses with us the importance of teamwork and hard work in his volunteer activities and in daily life.

Hong Kong Med J 2018 Dec;24(6):644–5

Part of a larger whole: serving in the Government Flying Service. An interview with Dr Ralph Cheung
Image: HKMJ; CC BY-NC-ND 4.0
Reminiscence: Artefacts from the Hong Kong Museum of Medical Sciences

Dr. Henry Phillips’ graduation certificate from the Hong Kong College of Medicine for Chinese, 1906
Dr. Henry Phillips (1867-1918) was one of 19 foreign students to attend Hong Kong College of Medicine for Chinese Hong Kong. His graduation certificate, dated 1906, provides the centrepiece for this article. To provide some historical context for the certificate, Prof. Faith Ho provides a brief biography of the recipient, Dr. Phillips, and some details of the Hong Kong College of Medicine for Chinese Hong Kong as it was at that time.

Hong Kong Med J 2018 Dec;24(6):647–9

Dr Henry Phillips’ graduation certificate from the Hong Kong College of Medicine for Chinese, 1906
Image: HKMJ; CC BY-NC-ND 4.0
Review Article

Epidemiology of myopia and prevention of myopia progression in children in East Asia: a review
Myopia (short-sightedness) is very common in East Asia. These days, there are several options available for slowing myopia progression in children. These treatments are important to limit development of high myopia and associated vision-threatening complications. Treatments can be pharmacological (eg, eye drops) or optical (eg, specially-designed glasses or contact lenses); lifestyle modifications (eg, spending more time outdoors) are also effective. In this review, C.Y. Mak et al. examine the regional epidemiology of myopia and provide updated evidence regarding interventions to slow myopia progression in children.

Hong Kong Med J 2018 Dec;24(6):602–9? |? Epub 3 Dec 2018

Epidemiology of myopia and prevention of myopia progression in children in East Asia: a review
Image: Gumenyuk I.S.; CC BY-SA 4.0
CME?? Medical Practice

Medication overuse headache: strategies for prevention and treatment using a multidisciplinary approach
Medication overuse headache affects patients who have migraines and frequent headaches. Medication overuse headache is often not recognised by primary care physicians or general practitioners, as patients may overuse medications that are freely available without a prescription. Overuse of codeine-containing analgesics is particularly problematic and contributes to ongoing morbidity and opioid-related mortality. M. van Driel et al. provide an overview of the detection, prevention, and management of medication overuse headache.

Hong Kong Med J 2018 Dec;24(6):617–22

Medication overuse headache: strategies for prevention and treatment using a multidisciplinary approach
Image: pixabay; CC0 1.0
CME?? Review Article

Group A Streptococcus disease in Hong Kong children: an overview
Streptococcus pyogenes is the cause of many important human diseases, ranging from pharyngitis and mild superficial skin infections to life-threatening systemic diseases. T.N.H. Leung et al. review the diagnosis and treatment of Streptococcus infections, which typically begin in the throat, such as pharyngitis (strep throat), or the skin, such as skin infections (impetigo). More severe infections can be fatal, such as Scarlet fever, which is caused by a streptococcal toxin. Streptococcus pyogenes disease is readily treatable, as the organism is invariably sensitive to penicillin. Delayed treatment of this common childhood pathogen is associated with significant mortality and morbidity.

Hong Kong Med J 2018 Dec;24(6):593–601? |? Epub 9 Nov 2018

Group A Streptococcus disease in Hong Kong children: an overview
Image: CDC PHIL; Public Domain

 

 

 

 


Information for